Lean Coaching and Training from a Solid Christian perspective

Don’t Let a Defect Escape!

“The in-station quality pillar [of the Lean system] is attributed to Sakichi Toyoda, who invented the first fully automated loom for making cloth. One of his many inventions along the way was a device that automatically stopped the loom when a single thread broke, which called attention to the problem so humans could fix it […]

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Stop and Fix Problems: “Jidoka”

When I first learned about the Lean Business Culture, I was impressed by a concept called “In-Station Quality.” Here’s how it’s defined by Jeff Liker: In-station quality (preventing problems from being passed down the line) is much more effective and less costly than inspecting and repairing quality problems after the fact.”  The Toyota Way 2nd […]

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Improvement and Job Satisfaction

“Improvement is not just seen as a win for the company but also as a way for employees to find satisfaction in their jobs and for management to sustain motivation by recognizing real efforts.”  The Lean Strategy by Michael Balle, Daniel Jones, Jacques Chaize, and Orest Fiume (McGraw Hill, 2017) p. 100.

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The Most Motivating Way

“It turns out that the most motivating way in which people can be involved with their workplace is the improvement of their own work processes.” Leading the Lean Enterprise Transformation (2nd Ed.) by George Koenigsaecker (CRC Press, 2013)

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The Benefit of Kaizen (Improvement)

“The real benefit of a kaizen effort goes way beyond the performance improvement you (almost) always get. The value lies in the learning for the team (they learn how to do their job better) and for yourself (you better understand the issues of the process).”  The Lean Strategy by Michael Balle, Daniel Jones, Jacques Chaize, […]

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Kaizen

“The root idea of all Lean thinking is kaizen: continuous, small step-by-step improvements done by the people who do the work themselves.”  The Lean Strategy by Michael Balle, Daniel Jones, Jacques Chaize, and Orest Fiume (McGraw Hill, 2017) p. 32.

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Embrace Both Stability and Change

“Lean thinking, on the other hand, is about embracing both stability (standards) and change (kaizen literally means ‘change for the better’) at the team level, where work really happens.”   The Lean Strategy by Michael Balle, Daniel Jones, Jacques Chaize, and Orest Fiume (McGraw Hill, 2017) p. 128.

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Make Improvement Possible

“As [Misaki] Imai explained so well in [his book] Kaizen, it is impossible to improve any process until it is standardized. If the process is shifting from here to there, then any improvement will just be one more variation that will be altered by the next variation. One must standardize, and thus stabilize, the process […]

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Standardized Work: A Different Mentality

Lean turn-around expert Art Byrne responding to interview question about ‘Standard Work’ during his leadership at the Danaher Corporation:“It’s a simple concept – for every job, create a standard and a time frame for it, all the steps in sequence and then you want everyone to do it that way to create a repeatable foundation. […]

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Standards are the Starting Point

“Until standards are defined in any operation, it is not possible to truly make improvements.”  The Toyota Way Fieldbook by Jeffrey Liker & David Meier (McGraw-Hill, 2006) p. 112.

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